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Posts tagged ‘Resilient Land of Scotland’

Scotland Sets Wind Record, Provides Enough Electricity for 3.3 Million Homes in March

True Activist

12 April

By Amanda Froelich

Slowly but surely, it is becoming fact that households and entire countries can run on clean, renewable energy. Costa Rica, for instance, ran on renewable energy sources for 285 days in 2015 and achieved similarly in 2016. Additionally, Denmark produced 160 percent of its energy needs in one day in July of 2015 via wind power.

Now it has been reported that Scottish turbines provided 1.2 million megawatt hours of electricity to the National Grid—enough energy to meet the electrical needs of 136 percent of households in the country (or ~3.3 million homes). What’s more, 58 percent of Scotland’s entire electricity needs were met for the entire month. The Independent reported that on March 17 and March 19, enough energy was generated to power Scotland’s total power needs for an entire day.

An analysis of WeatherEnergy data by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Scotland revealed that the amount of energy generated in March increased by a staggering 81 percent compared to the same month in 2016.

WWF Scotland’s director, Lang Banks, commented on the monumental achievement:

“Given this March wasn’t as windy as it has been in some previous years, this year’s record output shows the importance of continuing to increase capacity by building new wind farms.

“As well as helping to power our homes and businesses, wind power supports thousands of jobs and continues to play an important role in Scotland’s efforts to address global climate change by avoiding millions of tonnes of carbon emissions every year,” he added.

Karen Robinson of WeatherEnergy added her insight:

“It’s massively impressive how Scotland has steadily grown its wind power output [over] the years. The total output from turbines this March was up more than four-fifths compared to the same period last year. This was enough power to provide the equivalent of the electrical needs of over three million homes. More importantly, it meant the equivalent of almost three-fifths of Scotland’s total electricity needs during March were met by onshore wind power.”

Now that Scotland has set an impressive new wind record, the WWF is calling on political parties to continue backing onshore wind power to help the country meet its carbon emission cut targets. One of the country’s goals is to deliver the equivalent of 50 percent of the energy required for Scotland’s heat, transport and electricity needs from renewable energy sources by 2030.

Source: EcoWatch.

Link: http://www.ecowatch.com/scotland-wind-power-record-2357425827.html.

Scottish lawmakers back independence referendum call

March 28, 2017

EDINBURGH, Scotland (AP) — Scottish lawmakers voted Tuesday to seek a new referendum on independence, presenting the British government with an unwelcome distraction as it prepares to push the European Union exit button.

The Edinburgh-based legislature voted 69-59 to ask the U.K. government to sanction an independence vote that would be held within the next two years. Outside, several dozen independence supporters bearing Scottish and EU flags broke into cheers and tears of joy as they heard the news.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who asked lawmakers to authorize her to request the referendum, says Scots must be given the chance to vote on their future before Britain leaves the European Union.

British Prime Minister Theresa May plans to launch the U.K’s two-year process of exiting the EU on Wednesday by triggering Article 50 of the bloc’s key treaty. Britain as a whole voted to leave the bloc in a referendum last year, but Scots voted by a large margin to stay.

“Scotland’s future should be in Scotland’s hands,” Sturgeon told lawmakers before the vote. Scottish voters rejected independence in a 2014 referendum that Sturgeon’s Scottish National Party called a once-in-a-generation vote. But Sturgeon says Brexit has altered conditions dramatically.

She says there should be a new plebiscite on independence between fall 2018 and spring 2019, when details of Britain’s divorce terms with the bloc are clear. Sturgeon said that whatever the final terms, Brexit would mean “significant and profound” change for Scotland.

“That change should not be imposed upon us,” she said. “We should have the right to decide the nature of that change.” May, whose government must approve the referendum for it to be legally binding, says the time is not right. She says all parts of the U.K. — England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland — must pull together to get the best-possible deal with the EU.

Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson agreed, saying Tuesday that Scots do not want “the division and rancor of another referendum campaign.” The Scottish parliament had been due to vote on Sturgeon’s referendum demand last week, but the session was adjourned after Wednesday’s extremist attack in London.

Sturgeon’s referendum call was backed by the governing Scottish nationalists and the Greens, and opposed by the Conservative and Labour parties. It’s unclear what could break the stalemate between Edinburgh and London. British officials have indicated they would not agree to another independence referendum until Britain’s EU exit is over and done with — a process that could take longer than two years.

David Mundell, the British government’s Scotland minister, said the U.K. government would not be “entering into negotiations on whether there should be another independence referendum during the Brexit process.”

“It’s not appropriate to have a referendum whilst people do now know what the future relationship between the U.K. and the EU will be,” he said. Sturgeon said after the vote that she would “seek sensible and constructive discussion” with the British government later this week.

“I hope the United Kingdom government will respect the view of parliament,” she said. “This is simply about giving people in Scotland a choice.” Should that fail, Sturgeon promised to inform the parliament of next steps after its Easter break next month.

In Edinburgh, supporters of Scottish independence urged Sturgeon to forge ahead. Scott Murray, a 71-year-old music tutor, said the vote for Brexit had changed everything. “I think we should have another referendum,” Murray said. “I feel that we are divorced from what happens in the south of England and we should be our own country and stand on our own two feet.”

But plumber Brian Hamilton, 45, said he’d be happier if members of the Scottish National Party government “got on with their day jobs” rather than focusing on Europe. “They say they speak for the people of Scotland, but they don’t speak for the people of Scotland because they are not representing me whatsoever,” he said.

Lawless reported from London.

Scotland seeks new independence referendum amid Brexit spat

March 13, 2017

LONDON (AP) — Scotland’s leader delivered a shock twist to Britain’s EU exit drama on Monday, announcing that she will seek authority to hold a new independence referendum in the next two years because Britain is dragging Scotland out of the EU against its will.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said she would move quickly to give voters a new chance to leave the United Kingdom because Scotland was being forced into a “hard Brexit” that it didn’t support. Britons decided in a June 23 referendum to leave the EU, but Scots voted by 62 to 38 percent to remain.

Scotland must not be “taken down a path that we do not want to go down without a choice,” Sturgeon said. The move drew a quick rebuke from Prime Minister Theresa May, who said a second referendum would be hugely disruptive and was not justified because evidence shows most Scottish voters oppose a new independence vote.

May accused Sturgeon’s Scottish National Party of political “tunnel vision” and called the referendum “deeply regrettable.” “It sets Scotland on a course for more uncertainty and division,” she said. Sturgeon spoke in Edinburgh as Britain’s Parliament was on the verge of approving a Brexit bill that will allow the U.K. to start the formal withdrawal from the EU within days. May plans to trigger the two-year exit process by the end of March.

Sturgeon said she would ask the Scottish Parliament next week to start the process of calling a referendum, to be held between the fall of 2018 and the spring of 2019. She said by then, details of Britain’s post-Brexit deal with the EU would be clear and Scottish voters would be able to make “an informed choice.”

The British government must agree before a legally binding referendum can be held. It didn’t say Monday whether it would do so, but said an independence ballot “would be divisive and cause huge economic uncertainty at the worst possible time.”

In a 2014 referendum, Scottish voters rejected independence by a margin of 55 percent to 45 percent. But Sturgeon said that the U.K.’s decision to leave the EU had brought about a “material change of circumstances.”

Sturgeon said that she had sought compromise with May’s government, but had been met with a “brick wall of intransigence.” Sturgeon has been seeking a deal that would allow Scotland to stay in the European single market and customs union. But she said she has become convinced May is pursuing a “hard Brexit” that would leave Britain outside those arrangements, which many U.K. businesses see as crucial.

“I am not turning my back on further discussions should the U.K. government change its mind,” she said. Sturgeon is taking a big gamble. Although the prospect of Brexit has likely boosted support for independence, polls do not indicate it has majority backing. And there is no guarantee the EU would allow an independent Scotland to remain a member.

Former European Commission president Jose Manuel Barroso has set out the legal view that if one part of an EU country becomes an independent state, it would have to apply for its own EU membership. On Monday, commission spokesman Margaritis Schinas said “the Barrosso doctrine … would apply, obviously” to Scotland.

Apart from Sturgeon’s SNP, Britain’s main political parties oppose independence. “The 2014 Scottish independence referendum was billed as a once-in-a-generation event,” Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn said. “The result was decisive and there is no appetite for another referendum.”

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron said Scotland could find itself with “the worst of all worlds” — outside both the U.K. and the EU. Asked whether she would resign if she lost the referendum, Sturgeon said she wasn’t planning to lose.

“Sometimes you’ve got to do what you think it right in politics,” she said. “And I think it’s right for Scotland to have a choice.”

Scotland seeks own future in EU despite UK’s departure

December 20, 2016

LONDON (AP) — Scottish leader Nicola Sturgeon offered proposals Tuesday to protect Scotland’s place in Europe after Britain leaves the European Union, saying it’s possible to keep Scotland in Europe’s single market even after Brexit.

But Prime Minister Theresa May played down the prospect of Scotland getting a separate Brexit deal, saying that her government will be negotiating a “United Kingdom approach” with Brussels. Britain voted to leave the EU in June but 62 percent of voters in Scotland backed remaining in the 28-nation bloc. Sturgeon, who backs Scottish independence, said Britain’s departure should be “flexible” to address the needs of the U.K.’s different constituents — England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Launching a document titled “Scotland’s Place in Europe,” Sturgeon said it was best for Scotland — and the rest of Britain — to remain in the European single market and customs union. Leaving the EU single market, she argues, would be a blow to many Scottish — and British — businesses that would face new tariffs on trade. Staying in the single market though would require signing up to EU rules on the freedom of movement — regaining control of borders was one of the main reasons behind the vote to leave the EU.

Sturgeon argued that the EU referendum did not give a mandate to take any part of Britain out of the European single market. Nonetheless, she conceded it was unlikely that Britain will choose to stay in the free trade bloc.

In that event, Sturgeon proposed that Scotland could stay in the European Economic Area by means of special arrangements like those that apply to the Channel Islands and the Faroe Islands. She also proposed a substantial transfer of new powers to the Scottish Parliament — including over immigration and import and export control — in order for Scotland to pursue its own relationship with the EU.

May’s office at Downing Street said the British government would look closely at Sturgeon’s proposals, which are expected to be discussed in detail in January. But May said it was “not right” to accept “differential relationships” for separate parts of Britain with Brussels. She said she has promised to seriously consider any plans, but “there may be proposals that are impractical.”

“What we will be negotiating is a United Kingdom approach and a United Kingdom relationship with the European Union,” she told lawmakers.

Scottish police investigate killing of Muslim shopkeeper

March 26, 2016

LONDON (AP) — Scottish police say the killing of a Muslim shopkeeper who wished Christians a happy Easter is being investigated as “religiously prejudiced.” Vigils were held Friday and Saturday in memory of 40-year-old Asad Shah, who was killed Thursday night in Glasgow.

He had apparently posted messages on Facebook calling for religious harmony: “Good Friday and very happy Easter, especially to my beloved Christian nation x!” Police say a 32-year-old man has been arrested in connection with Shah’s death. The suspect, who police say is Muslim, has not been identified or charged.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon joined the Friday vigil in support of Shah and his family in Glasgow. Many lit candles and left flowers. Roughly 150 people also gathered in a light rain on Saturday to honor him, an event organized by local teens.

Police Scotland said that “a full investigation is under way to establish the full circumstances surrounding the death which is being treated as religiously prejudiced.”

Scotland wants better fisheries future

Oct. 10, 2011

EDINBURGH, Scotland, Oct. 10 (UPI) — Despite a $19 million grant from the European Union for its fisheries sector, the Scottish government said regional polices must be in the national interest.

Scottish Fisheries Secretary Richard Lochhead said his country was optimistic about 2012 now that it had the $19 million grant to support its fishing fleet.

“We must take advantage of the plethora of opportunities that lie ahead of us in 2012 and maximize the benefits to Scotland in what could be a truly pivotal year for our fishing industry,” he said in a statement.

The Scottish government said it was expecting the European Commission to introduce sanctions against the Faroe Islands and Iceland for overfishing mackerel in the region. Edinburgh said fishermen from both countries are taking on more mackerel than their internationally agreed upon share.

The European Union is working to address a common fisheries policy aimed at rebuilding the fisheries industry.

“We must ensure we get the best deal we can for Scotland’s fishermen in the common fisheries policy negotiations,” said Lochhead.

Scotland said there was an 11 percent decrease in the volume of mackerel landings in 2010 compared with the previous year because of a decrease in quotas stemming from management plans for that species.

Source: United Press International (UPI).

Link: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Energy-Industry/2011/10/10/Scotland-wants-better-fisheries-future/UPI-41551318257144/.

Flooding continues in England as new storm hits Scotland

December 30, 2015

LONDON (AP) — Heavy rains and gusty winds are causing more problems for residents in large swaths of Britain. Officials say 5,500 homes in Scotland lost power Wednesday as gale-force winds hit.

About 3,000 homes in England and Wales were also reported to be without electricity. However, the number of “severe” flood warnings has dropped as many rivers in northern England are receding from record-high levels.

Environmental officials warn that the ground remains heavily saturated, making it likely that more rains could quickly lead to flooding. Officials also asked the public to stay away from parts of Tadcaster, 205 miles (330 kilometers) north of London, where a bridge said to date from around 1700 collapsed on Tuesday because of rising water in the River Wharfe.

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